Like Father 30 Years Ago, Jyotiraditya Scindia Misses Out On Chief Minister’s Post

Like Father 30 Years Ago, Jyotiraditya Scindia Misses Out On Chief Minister's Post

Jyotiraditya Scindia is the last scion of the Scindia family of Marathas

Bhopal: 

Almost 30 years after late Madhavrao Scindia was denied the post of Madhya Pradesh chief minister, history repeated itself as the “so near yet so far” fate befell his son Jyotiraditya.

In 1989, Madhavrao Scindia was all set to be the Chief Minister but strident opposition from senior leader Arjun Singh, asked to step down as Chief Minister after the Churhat lottery scam, ensured that then Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi could not give the former Gwalior royal the coveted post.

Mr Singh, in a bid to get his way at the time, had even kept his MLAs ensconced in the Char Imli residence of loyalist Harivansh Singh.

Madhavrao Scindia was so confident of being given the post that he had flown down from Delhi and camped in the state for two days.

Instead, Motilal Vora was made the chief minister. Twenty nine years later, Jyotiraditya Scindia also lost out on the chance to be among the youngest chief ministers of the central Indian state, as Kamal Nath, 72, was picked for the top job in the state.

Congress sources said that Jyotiraditya Scindia, Lok Sabha member from Guna, had pointed out to the party leadership that BJP’s slogan “Maaf Karo Maharaj, Apne toh Shivraj” was centred around him.

Mr Nath, nine-time Lok Sabha member from Chhindwara, made the cut due to his seniority and support of more party MLAs, the sources said.

Jyotiraditya Scindia is the last scion of the Scindia family of Marathas which ruled the Gwalior state in pre-independent central-India.

His grandmother Rajmata Vijaya Raje Scindia was one of the founding members of the Jana Sangh.

Following his mother, Madhavrao Scindia also joined the Jana Sangh. In 1971 Lok Sabha elections, the mother-son duo was among the few leaders who defied the Indira Gandhi wave and emerged victorious from their respective constituencies.

In 1980, he joined Indira Gandhi’s Congress, a party which had jailed his mother during the Emergency-era. His sisters, Vasundhara Raje and Yashodhara Raje later followed their mothers footsteps and joined the BJP.

[“source=ndtv”]

World’s First Baby Born Out Of Womb Transplanted From Dead Donor

World's First Baby Born Out Of Womb Transplanted From Dead Donor

A woman in Brazil who received a womb transplanted from a deceased donor has given birth to a baby girl in the first successful case of its kind, doctors reported.

The case, published in The Lancet medical journal, involved connecting veins from the donor uterus with the recipient’s veins, as well as linking arteries, ligaments and vaginal canals.

It comes after 10 previously known cases of uterus transplants from deceased donors – in the United States, the Czech Republic and Turkey – failed to produce a live birth.

The girl born in the Brazilian case was delivered via caesarean section at 35 weeks and three days, and weighed 2,550 grams (nearly 6 lbs), the case study said.

Dani Ejzenberg, a doctor at Brazil’s Sao Paulo University hospital who led the research, said the transplant – carried out in September 2016 when the recipient was 32 – shows the technique is feasible and could offer women with uterine infertility access to a larger pool of potential donors.

The current norm for receiving a womb transplant is that the organ would come from a live family member willing to donate it.

“The numbers of people willing and committed to donate organs upon their own deaths are far larger than those of live donors, offering a much wider potential donor population,” Ejzenberg said in a statement about the results.

She added, however, that the outcomes and effects of womb donations from live and deceased donors have yet to be compared, and said the technique could still be refined and optimised.

The first baby born after a live donor womb transplant was in Sweden in 2013. Scientists have so far reported a total of 39 procedures of this kind, resulting in 11 live births.

Experts estimate that infertility affects around 10 to 15 percent of couples of reproductive age worldwide. Of this group, around one in 500 women have uterine problems.

Before uterus transplants became possible, the only options to have a child were adoption or surrogacy.

In the Brazilian case, the recipient had been born without a uterus due to a condition called Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser syndrome. The donor was 45 and died of a stroke.

[“source=cnbc”]