Australia’s Top 100 Food & Drink Companies 2018

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Every year, in collaboration with market research firm IBISWorld, we gather together all of the latest company data to reveal a ranking by revenue of Australia’s heaviest hitters in food and beverage to create our Australia’s Top 100 Food & Drink Companies report.

This report, which is sponsored by Foodmach, lists companies according to their most recently reported revenues in an easy-to-read format, and in this special edition, we’ll also reveal the shuffling of the ranks of Australia’s top ten companies, the best performing industry sectors, and the companies that rocketed up the list on rising revenues.

Australia’s food and beverage sector is worth an annual $131 billion and is the nation’s largest manufacturing sector, and according to IBISWorld, the top 100 food and beverage companies in Australia collectively generate in excess of $104 billion in revenue (up from more than $100 billion in 2017-18) and employ more than 130,000 Australians.

The report also shows that the dairy category is performing strongly in Australia with the help of increased exports of fresh milk to growing Asian markets, particularly China, and the fruit industry has benefitted from increased demand for avocado and citrus domestically and internationally.

Many of the Top 100 companies have successfully expanded into large export markets, with notable examples including Turners & Growers, Costa Group, Teys Australia, Freedom Foods and The a2 Milk Company.

The fastest movers on the list include Allied Pinnacle, Superior Food Group, The a2 Milk Company, Bellamy’s Organic, and Freedom Foods Group.

Several new companies also entered this year’s Top 100, either though market consolidation, organic growth, or due to their reclassification by IBISWorld, including PepsiCo Australia & New Zealand, Saputo Dairy Australia, Tassal Group, and Huon Aquaculture Group.

List drop-offs included Mars and Burra Foods due to consolidation, while falling revenues saw last year’s #74 – Cerebos Foods, last year’s #94 – Tully Sugar, and last year’s #100 – Milne AgriGroup exit the list.

Welcome to our Top 100 Food & Drink Companies 2018 report, where you’ll find the nation’s food and beverage heavyweights listed in order of their most recently reported revenue

Read more at http://www.foodanddrinkbusiness.com.au/top-100/exclusive-australia-s-top-100-food-and-drink-companies-2018#cRp08vibbjfVYtLj.99

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Food & Drink: Amaro’s Table brings ancient drink to life

A flight of three amari await tasting at Amaro’s Table in downtown Vancouver. Rachel Pinsky

Sara Newton, beverage director at Amaro’s Table, is an amaro whisperer. She knows you probably haven’t tried an amaro, so she has created amaro flights, paired with helpful note cards, to bring you on a buzzy journey through the world of this ancient amber digestif and darling of craft bartenders.

Amaro is the Italian word for “bitter.” But that barely explains the complex flavors created by mashing a mosaic of traditionally foraged ingredients in alcohol, sweetening it with sugar or honey, and aging it in casks or bottles. Unusual herbs like gentian, angelica, cardoon, cinchona, lemon verbena, juniper, anise, fennel, bay laurel, rue, and wormwood create curious flavors and aromas when combined with roots, flowers, bark and citrus.

In his influential book “Amaro,” Brad Thomas Parsons explains, “Generally speaking, amaro refers to the collective class of Italian-made aromatic, herbal, bittersweet liquors traditionally served as a digestif after a meal.” Unlike Italian wines, amari (the plural form of amaro) don’t have a DOC (controlled designation of origin) label, so bitter liqueurs from places outside of Italy can also be called an amaro.

At Amaro’s Table, flights consist of one-ounce pours of three different amari. Many craft cocktail bars have several varieties of this bitter; here, there are more than 30 imported and domestic amari colorfully decorating the neat oak shelves behind the cozy, bright white bar. Newton likes to have “a good representation of all the varieties.”

I tried a Bartender’s Choice flight of three different amari. This flight changes regularly.

Newton thoughtfully designs a card that lists all the amari you’re trying in the same order as they appear on the wood serving plank. This card has the name of the amaro, where it’s made and some tasting notes. The amari are set before you in order from lightest to most bitter (similar to a beer flight). There’s no correct way to drink an amaro. They can be served with soda water or a twist of citrus, on the rocks or neat. At Amaro’s Table, the flights are served neat in squat, wide glasses that allow you to gaze at a color spectrum from light caramel to burnt amber and sniff the array of aromas.

On my visit, the flight included amari from three Italian regions: Amaro Sibilla from Muccia, Black Note from Piedmont and Averna Amaro from Sicily.

The Amaro Sibilla from the mountainous Marche region of Southern Italy was invented in 1868 by Girolamo Varnelli and used as a remedy for shepherds. Honey of the Sibillini Mountains is used to sweeten this tongue-tingling, herbaceous drink. It’s aged for at least six months to allow the flavors to blend and mature. It smells like honey and raisins. When it coats the mouth and tongue, there’s a surprising tingling sensation. After the initial bewilderment wears off, the tingling and numbness is stimulating. It signals the awakening of your salivary glands in preparation for a meal.

The second amaro was Black Note out of Turin. Newton told me that this is a good beginner’s amaro. She said, “A lot of times, it’s one of the ones I introduce people to so they can learn about amari. It becomes one they are enamored with and infatuated with it. It does have so many layers to it. You have that toasted marshmallow and that orange peel and then that dandelion, gentian. The beginning of it is so herbal, but at the end, it’s so fresh.” It smelled like anise and herbs. It tasted like marshmallows — this sweetness expertly tempered by herbaceousness.

The final amaro was Averna Amaro from Sicily. It smelled like Sprite. This citrus finish comes from the essential oils of bitter lemon. It tasted sweet, subtly aromatic with notes of anise, juniper, sage, vanilla and citrus. The recipe was first made in 1868 by Benedictine monks of the San Spirito Abbey in Caltanissetta, Sicily. The monks passed on their recipe to Salvatore Averna, a benefactor of the abbey. The Averna family made this bittersweet bitter until 2014, when it was purchased by Gruppo Campari in Milano, Italy. Averna is still infused in Caltanissetta, using the traditional local ingredients.

If you prefer to just dip your toe into the amaro pool, there are several amaro cocktails on the menu that allow you to get a taste of amaro mixed with other flavors. The Amaro’s cola (Amaro CioCiaro, Topo Chico and a twist) is a pleasant doorway into the world of this fascinating drink.

As Newton advised, “Everything is overwhelming in the beginning. Start somewhere.”

[“source=forbes]

Save Your Wardrobe Fashion App Promises Double Whammy Of More Streamlined & Sustainable Living

Ever since Japanese ‘organizing consultant’ Marie Kondo’s consistently best-selling 2011 opus The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up de-cluttering has become an international obsession, part of a pseudo-spiritual quest for more meaningful living. And with good reason; according to the UK arm of US weight loss business Weight Watchers there is currently at least £10.5bn of unworn items in Britain’s wardrobes. While part of that figure comes from too-wishful thinking (the extra pounds never shifted, the clothes that never fit) there’s also the more significant story of too much stuff presenting a simple lack of visibility, clouding our judgement regarding what we need or want to buy next. The result is a vastly unsatisfying cycle of irrelevant things and increasingly flabby shopper-brand relationships.

Reclaiming the peace of mind that comes with neither wasting precious resources or your own cold hard cash is what London-based Save Your Wardrobe Co-Founder Hasna Kourda, an economics and corporate strategy graduate and a former luxury fashion sales assistant, is banking on: “When I worked in retail I saw a massive loss of trust between consumers and brands because people constantly felt they were being given the hard sell, not serviced according to what they really wanted or needed. Part of the aim of this concept, which fundamentally remedies the fact most people don’t even know what’s in their own wardrobe, is to re-build loyalty and create relevancy, which will raise sales figures if not numbers of ‘things’ sold.”

The app, which is free to users (brands will pay for the data/insights it delivers) is rooted in the building of an entire virtual wardrobe. This happens in two ways to encompass both new and existing items. Firstly, using advanced computer vision tech users can photograph their existing clothing which the system will then categorize, in most cases even establishing the brand. Secondly, users can allow (ostensibly via Google GOOGL +0.21%permissions) their digital receipts to be automatically read. Assuming the brand in question is affiliated to SYW via an AP the system will recognize the SKU, allowing it to register every detail including size, color, and date of purchase. A 30-day cooling period will adjust the data should items be returned.

Alex Holyoake / Unsplash

Computer vision tech will recognize and categorize items (Credit: Alex Holyoake).

In order to avoid the system becoming nothing more than a backwards-looking personal fashion filter bubble -rendering it much harder to offer suggestions or predict new influences – SYW is currently working with vast fashion shopping network ShopStyle’s database of brands so users can also browse a vast number of brands to create product wish-lists. Later, it will also tap into users’ social media activity to flesh out their profiles still further.

The system will also be connected to users’ calendars, so it knows, for example, when they’re due to go on holiday, and to where, or when they have a job interview coming up and will send them product recommendations. Users have a dashboard showing both their curated selections of clothing for various occasions (“playlists of outfits”) as well as their full digitized wardrobe, generating an enormous sense of control.

For brands investing in the concept as a tool to help them plan, produce, market and/or buy more accurately, the critical factor is that it will provide a window onto tastes and preferences, grouping users into clusters and micro segments – essentially people exhibiting similar desires, behaviors or attitudes. Because it straddles multiple brands it’s a more realistic reflection of real life; the non-brand-monogamous consumer at play .

A second layer, devised to take the intelligence offered to the next level, is the introduction of a suite of core services – dry cleaning, repairs, re-sales and alteration – that Kourda believes will spotlight how users feel about their clothing. It will, she suggests, present a kind of longer-than-usual narrative for products, understanding them not as single purchases but an ongoing story that reflects the attitudes of their owners. “This is where online fashion retail has become slightly unstuck,” says Kourda. “It doesn’t present the full picture of searching, buying and aftercare over time and nor does it tap into the notion of buying mindfully.”

Furthering the notion of a more mindful mode of operating in general, drawing on her own experiences of luxury selling, Kourda believes the app’s success will lie in “assisting not annoying people with relentless alerts. It’s about understanding the key moments. For that reason, we won’t be pestering people by sending notifications [that appear outside the app, on users’ home-screens]. We believe that getting the timing right is what will create a ‘sticky’ system’.” No ads, nor sponsored content affirm a commitment to useful engagement over mercenary marketing.

As with any algorithm/machine learning based system the more parties involved and the more data is accrued the more pertinent the suggestions. “There is an opportunity here for real relevancy, rather than creating product and then working out how to sell it to people,” says Kourda. “We want people [customers and brands] not to think of store as cash machines chasing money but places for amplified experiences and connections. Customers want to feel ‘seen’, they actively expect it.”

source:-forbes.

All The Spots Where Voters Can Eat & Drink For Free Today

Voting App on Phone with Pizza
produced by Julie Borowsky; photographed by Tayler Smith.
Participating in the democratic process is an essential part of living America. Though it does require time and energy to research candidates and come up with your voting plan, so after that part is done, you might require a little pick-me-up. This Election Day, you can get an extra pat on the back after doing your civic duty by visiting a number of different restaurants, bars, café, and coffee shops around the country.
Today, many spots will be giving out free food and drinks to voters who come in sporting their “I Voted” stickers. Even if you don’t need a free coffee to make you get out and vote during this vital midterm election, it’ll still be nice to reward yourself for exercising your rights. Take a look ahead to see where you can go to get that small reward.
Baked By Melissa:
Today, all customers who walk into a Baked by Melissa store with an “I Voted” sticker will receive a free cupcake. The mini cupcake company is also offering voters 10% off on bakedbymelissa.com with the code “IVOTED2018” today and tomorrow.
[“source=ndtv”]

Baby Food & Drink Market 2018 – Global Key Players, Trends, Share, Industry Size, Sales, Supply, Demand, Analysis & Forecast to 2025

The report provides a comprehensive analysis of the Baby Food & Drink industry market by types, applications, players and regions. This report also displays the 2013-2025 production, Consumption, revenue, Gross margin, Cost, Gross, market share, CAGR, and Market influencing factors of the Baby Food & Drink industry in USA, EU, China, India, Japan and other regions

Market Analysis by Players: This report includes following top vendors in terms of company basic information, product category, sales (volume), revenue (Million USD), price and gross margin (%).
Mead Johnson
Nestle
Danone
Abbott
FrieslandCampina
Heinz
Bellamy
Topfer
HiPP
Perrigo
Arla
Holle
Fonterra
Westland Dairy
Pinnacle

Request a Sample Report @  https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/3505922-global-baby-food-drink-industry-2018-research-report-and-forecast-to-2025

Market Analysis by Regions: Each geographical region is analyzed as Sales, Market Share (%) by Types & Applications, Production, Consumption, Imports & Exports Analysis, and Consumption Forecast.
USA
Europe
Japan
China
India
Southeast Asia
South America
South Africa
Others

Market Analysis by Types: Each type is studied as Sales and Market Share (%), Revenue (Million USD), Price, Gross Margin and more similar information.
Infant Formula
Baby Cereals
Baby Snacks
Bottled & Canned Baby Food
Others

Market Analysis by Applications: Each application is studied as Sales and Market Share (%), Revenue (Million USD), Price, Gross Margin and more similar information. Automobile
0-6 Months
6-12 Months
>12 Months

[“source=ndtv”]

Southern Culture And Lifestyle Magazine Garden & Gun Finds Growth Beyond The Printed Page

When you’re a print magazine and your vital signs are strong, what do you do? Enjoy the ride and thank your lucky stars that you’re bucking the secular trend of print decline? Bet the ranch on risky new investments? Or develop synergistic new events and retail initiatives?

For Garden & Gun’s Rebecca Darwin, CEO and co-founder of the magazine, it’s option three, and all initiatives come down to one strategy: Deepening the connection people have with the brand.

Founder and CEO Rebecca Darwin.Garden & Gun

Garden & Gun has become a living case study for a successful magazine in the digital age, offering rich, textured, carefully focused stories, lush layouts and striking photography on Southern culture—touching on travel, music, food, upscale hunting, literature, home, lifestyle and more, and winning three National Magazine Awards among many other forms of recognition in its 11 years of existence.

Garden & Gun, Darwin points out nearly every time she’s asked to describe it, is not a Southern magazine. It’s a national magazine about a region. And G&G has always stressed that it’s not just a print magazine—it’s a full-service media brand, encompassing print, digital, creative services and events. In fact, Garden & Gun does more than 50 events per year—everything from crafts expositions and clay-shooting competitions, to international travel tours and a Mint Julep Month for the bourbon distiller Maker’s Mark, in which G&G brought bartenders from around the South to an event in New York.

“I’m always thinking about what else would our readers like?” Darwin says. “What’s an additional touch point for the brand?” This activity has ramped up in the last 12 months especially.

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  • In April, Garden & Gun opened its first-ever restaurant, the Garden & Gun Club in Atlanta. Located in The Battery Atlanta (near the Atlanta Braves’ SunTrust Park), the restaurant seeks to bring the magazine to life.
  • The brand also expanded its online and real-world retail experiences by bringing its online retail concept Mercantile & Co. under the company’s existing Fieldshop, offering an assortment of products from makers and artisans across the South. Fieldshop now includes an e-commerce destination, a brick-and-mortar shop in The Dewberry Hotel in Charleston, and space in the Garden & Gun Club.
  • Garden & Gun‘s Made in the South Weekend just concluded at the magazine’s headquarters in Charleston. It celebrated Southern craftsmanship and makers, with live performances, panels, exclusive shopping experiences and a dinner at the historic Aiken-Rhett House.

“We still think about the reader,” Darwin says. “This obviously has grown way beyond the reader, but we look at what the different entry points are where people intersect with the brand. Our whole thinking is about deepening the relationship, not so much about broadening it as deepening.”

As important as deepening the connection is, the magazine has demonstrated some broadening in recent years as well. From 2013 to 2017, Garden & Gun’s total audited circulation, comprising both paid and verified distribution, increased by 31.8%, to 396,609. Its total paid circulation grew by nearly 100,000, to 342,656. Average newsstand sales increased as well, from 34,114 to 42,207.

Advertising has been more challenging, with print shaping up as slightly less than flat for 2018 (Darwin attributes this to the strong 10th-anniversary issue last year, saying the brand will be up slightly from 2016).

Like most print magazines, digital is a small piece of the advertising mix. “We brought on more people to work on digital and social,” Darwin says. “Year to date, we’re up about 35 percent over last year. It’s still a fairly small piece but you have to focus on it.” Not surprisingly, a lot of the digital advertising is from branded content—newsletters, agency-oriented marketing services and similar work.

“We’re having to be creative like everyone else in finding new ways to skin a cat, but we’re a very, very healthy magazine and a healthy company at this point,” Darwin says. “If you give people something that they want to read, then I definitely don’t see the end of magazines in sight. If you give them something worth taking their attention off all the noise out there, then they will.”

[“source=ndtv”]